Friday, September 24, 2021

The Inheritance

  ~ I received no compensation and opinions are 100% my own or my family. ~





Synopsis:  

When conflict photographer Jackson Swann dies, he leaves behind a conflict of his own making when his three daughters, each born from a different mother and unknown to each other, discover that they’re now part owners of Maison de Madelaine, the family’s Oregon vineyard—a once famous business struggling to recover from a worldwide economic collapse.


After a successful career as a child TV star, a disastrous time as a teen pop star, and now a successful author, Tess is, for the first time in her life, suffering from a serious case of writer’s block and identity crisis.


Charlotte, brought up to be a proper Southern wife, has given up her own career goals to support her husband while having spent the past year struggling to conceive a child to create a more perfect marriage. On the worst day of her life, she discovers her beloved father has died, she has two sisters she’d never been told about, and her husband has fallen in love with another woman.


Natalie, daughter of Jack’s long-time mistress, has always known about both half-sisters. Still mourning the loss of her mother, the death of her father a year later is a devastating blow. And she can’t help feeling that both her sisters may resent her for being the daughter their father decided to keep.


As the sisters reluctantly gather at the family vineyard, they're enchanted by the legacy they've inherited, and by their grandmother’s rich stories of life in WWII France and the love she found with a wounded American soldier who brought her to Oregon where they started Maison de Madelaine.


THE INHERITANCE 

Author: JoAnn Ross

ISBN: 9781335418562

Publication Date: September 7, 2021

Publisher: HQN Books



Buy Links: 

BookShop.org

Harlequin 

Barnes & Noble

Amazon

Books-A-Million

Powell’s 




New York Times and USA TODAY bestselling author JoAnn Ross has been published in twenty-seven countries. The author of over 100 novels, JoAnn lives with her husband and many rescue pets — who pretty much rule the house — in the Pacific Northwest.


Author Website

Facebook: @JoAnnRossbooks

Instagram: @JoAnnRossBooks

Goodreads


EXCERPT:

Prologue



Aberdeen, Oregon




Conflict photographer Jackson Swann had traveled to dark and deadly places in the world most people would never see. Nor want to. Along with dodging bullets and mortars, he’d survived a helicopter crash in Afghanistan, gotten shot mere inches from his heart in Niger and been stung by a death-stalker scorpion while embedded with the French Foreign Legion in Mali.

Some of those who’d worked with him over the decades had called him reckless. Rash. Dangerous. Over late-night beers or whatever else passed as liquor in whatever country they’d all swarmed to, other photographers and foreign journalists would argue about whether that bastard Jackson Swann had a death wish or merely considered himself invincible.

He did, after all, rush into high-octane situations no sane person would ever consider, and even when the shit hit the fan, somehow, he’d come out alive and be on the move again. Chasing the next war or crisis like a drug addict chased a high. The truth was that Jack had never believed himself to be im-mortal. Still, as he looked out over the peaceful view of rolling hills, the cherry trees wearing their spring profusion of pink blossoms, and acres of vineyards, he found it ironic that after having evaded the Grim Reaper so many times over so many decades, it was an aggressive and rapidly spreading lung cancer that was going to kill him.

Which was why he was here, sitting on the terraced patio of Chateau de Madeleine, the towering gray stone house that his father, Robert Swann, had built for his beloved war bride, Madeleine, to ease her homesickness. Oregon’s Willamette Valley was a beautiful place. But it was not Madeleine’s child-hood home in France’s Burgundy region where much of her family still lived.

Family. Jack understood that to many, the American dream featured a cookie-cutter suburban house, a green lawn you had to mow every weekend, a white picket fence, happy, well-fed kids and a mutt who’d greet him with unrestrained canine glee whenever he returned home from work. It wasn’t a bad dream. But it wasn’t, and never would be, his dream.

How could it be with the survivor’s guilt that shadowed him like a tribe of moaning ghosts? Although he’d never been all that introspective, Jack realized that the moral dilemma he’d experienced every time he’d had to force himself to re-main emotionally removed from the bloody scenes of chaos and death he was viewing through the lens of his camera had left him too broken to feel, or even behave like a normal human being.

Ten years ago, after his strong, robust father died of a sudden heart attack while fly-fishing, Jack had inherited the winery with his mother, who’d professed no interest in the day-to-day running of the family business. After signing over control of the winery to him, and declaring the rambling house too large for one woman, Madeleine Swann had moved into the guesthouse next to the garden she’d begun her first year in Oregon. A garden that supplied the vegetables and herbs she used for cooking many of the French meals she’d grown up with.

His father’s death had left Jack in charge of two hundred and sixty acres of vineyards and twenty acres of orchards. Not wanting, nor able, to give up his wanderlust ways to settle down and become a farmer of grapes and cherries, Jack had hired Gideon Byrne, a recent widower with a five-year-old daughter, away from a Napa winery to serve as both manager and vintner.

“Are you sure you don’t want me to call them?” Gideon, walking toward him, carrying a bottle of wine and two glasses, asked not for the first time over the past weeks.

“The only reason that Tess would want to see me would be to wave me off to hell.” In the same way he’d never softened the impact of his photos, Jack never minced words nor romanticized his life. There would be no dramatic scenes with his three daughters—all now grown women with lives of their own—hovering over his deathbed.

“Have you considered that she might want to have an opportunity to talk with you? If for no other reason to ask—”

“Why I deserted her before her second birthday and never looked back? I’m sure her mother’s told her own version of the story, and the truth is that the answers are too damn complicated and the time too long past for that discussion.” It was also too late for redemption.

Jack doubted his eldest daughter would give a damn even if he could’ve tried to explain. She’d have no way of knowing that he’d kept track of her all these years, blaming himself when she’d spiraled out of control so publicly during her late teens and early twenties. Perhaps, if she’d had a father who came home every night for dinner, she would have had a more normal, stable life than the Hollywood hurricane her mother had thrown her into before her third birthday.

Bygones, he reminded himself. Anything he might say to his firstborn would be too little, too late. Tess had no reason to travel to Oregon for his sake, but hopefully, once he was gone, curiosity would get the better of her. His girls should know each other. It was long past time.

“Charlotte, then,” Gideon pressed. “You and Blanche are still technically married.”

Technically being the operative word.” The decades-long separation from his Southern socialite wife had always suited them both just fine. According to their prenuptial agreement, Blanche would continue to live her privileged life in Charleston, without being saddled with a full-time live-in husband, who’d seldom be around at any rate. Divorce, she’d informed him, was not an option. And if she had discreet affairs from time to time, who would blame her? Certainly not him.

“That’s no reason not to give Charlotte an opportunity to say goodbye. How many times have you seen her since she went to college? Maybe twice a year?”

“You’re pushing again,” Jack shot back. Hell, you’d think a guy would be allowed to die in peace without Jiminy Cricket sitting on his shoulder. “Though of the three of them, Char-lotte will probably be the most hurt,” he allowed.

His middle daughter had always been a sweet girl, running into his arms, hair flying behind her like a bright gold flag to give her daddy some “sugar”—big wet kisses on those rare occasions he’d wind his way back to Charleston. Or drop by Savannah to take her out to dinner while she’d been attending The Savannah School of Art and Design.

“The girl doesn’t possess Blanche’s steel magnolia strength.”

Having grown up with a mother who could find fault in the smallest of things, Charlotte was a people pleaser, and that part of her personality would kick into high gear whenever he rolled into the city. “And, call me a coward, but I’d just as soon not be around when her pretty, delusional world comes crashing down around her.” He suspected there were those in his daughter’s rarified social circle who knew the secret that the Charleston PI he’d kept on retainer hadn’t had any trouble uncovering.

“How about Natalie?” Gideon continued to press. “She doesn’t have any reason to be pissed at you. But I’ll bet she will be if you die without a word of warning. Especially after losing her mother last year.”

“Which is exactly why I don’t want to put her through this.”

He’d met Josette Seurat, the ebony-haired, dark-eyed French Jamaican mother of his youngest daughter, when she’d been singing in a club in the spirited Oberkampf district of Paris’s eleventh arrondissement. He’d fallen instantly, and by the next morning Jack knew that not only was the woman he’d spent the night having hot sex with his first true love, she was also the only woman he’d ever love. Although they’d never married, they’d become a couple, while still allowing space for each other to maintain their own individual lives, for twenty-six years. And for all those years, despite temptation from beautiful women all over the globe, Jack had remained faithful. He’d never had a single doubt that Josette had, as well.

With Josette having been so full of life, her sudden death from a brain embolism had hit hard. Although Jack had im-mediately flown to Paris from Syria to attend the funeral at a church built during the reign of Napoleon III, he’d been too deep in his own grief, and suffering fatigue—which, rather than jet lag, as he’d assumed, had turned out to be cancer—to provide the emotional support and comfort his third daughter had deserved.

“Josette’s death is the main reason I’m not going to drag Natalie here to watch me die. And you might as well quit playing all the guilt cards because I’m as sure of my decision as I was yesterday. And the day before that. And every other time over the past weeks you’ve brought it up. Bad enough you coerced me into making those damn videos. Like I’m some documentary maker.”

To Jack’s mind, documentary filmmakers were storytellers who hadn’t bothered to learn to edit. How hard was it to spend anywhere from two to ten hours telling a story he could capture in one single, perfectly timed photograph?

“The total length of all three of them is only twenty minutes,” Gideon said equably.

There were times when Jack considered that the man had the patience of a saint. Which was probably necessary when you’d chosen to spend your life watching grapes grow, then waiting years before the wine you’d made from those grapes was ready to drink. Without Gideon Byrne to run this place, Jack probably would have sold it off to one of the neighboring vineyards years ago, with the caveat that his mother would be free to keep the guesthouse, along with the larger, showier one that carried her name. Had he done that he would have ended up regretting not having a thriving legacy to pass on to his daughters.

“The total time works out to less than ten minutes a daughter. Which doesn’t exactly come close to a Ken Burns series,” Gideon pointed out.

“I liked Burns’s baseball one,” Jack admitted reluctantly. “And the one on country music. But hell, it should’ve been good, given that he took eight years to make it.”

Jack’s first Pulitzer had admittedly been a stroke of luck, being in the right place at the right time. More care had gone into achieving the perfect photos for other awards, but while he admired Burns’s work, he’d never have the patience to spend that much time on a project. His French mother had claimed he’d been born a pierre roulante—rolling stone—al-ways needing to be on the move. Which wasn’t conducive to family life, which is why both his first and second marriages had failed. Because he could never be the husband either of his very different wives had expected.

“Do you believe in life after death?” he asked.

Gideon took his time to answer, looking out over the vine-yards. “I like to think so. Having lost Becky too soon, it’d be nice to believe we’ll connect again, somewhere, somehow.” He shrugged. “On the other hand, there are days that I think this might be our only shot.”

“Josette came again last night.”

“You must have enjoyed that.”

“I always do.”


Excerpted from The Inheritance by JoAnn Ross, Copyright © 2021 by JoAnn Ross. Published by arrangement with Harlequin Books S.A.

Thursday, September 23, 2021

The One Hundred Years of Lenni and Margot

  ~ I received no compensation and opinions are 100% my own or my family. ~




Synopsis (from Amazon):  An extraordinary friendship. A lifetime of stories. 

Seventeen-year-old Lenni Pettersson lives on the Terminal Ward at the Glasgow Princess Royal Hospital. Though the teenager has been told she’s dying, she still has plenty of living to do. Joining the hospital’s arts and crafts class, she meets the magnificent Margot, an 83-year-old, purple-pajama-wearing, fruitcake-eating rebel, who transforms Lenni in ways she never imagined.

As their friendship blooms, a world of stories opens for these unlikely companions who, between them, have been alive for one hundred years. Though their days are dwindling, both are determined to leave their mark on the world. With the help of Lenni’s doting palliative care nurse and Father Arthur, the hospital’s patient chaplain, Lenni and Margot devise a plan to create one hundred paintings showcasing the stories of the century they have lived—stories of love and loss, of courage and kindness, of unexpected tenderness and pure joy.

Though the end is near, life isn’t quite done with these unforgettable women just yet.

Delightfully funny and bittersweet, heartbreaking yet ultimately uplifting, The One Hundred Years of Lenni and Margot reminds us of the preciousness of life as it considers the legacy we choose to leave, how we influence the lives of others even after we’re gone, and the wonder of a friendship that transcends time.







One (or more) Sentence Summary: LOVED IT, LOVED IT, LOVED IT! I would say this is a cross between My Sisters Keeper + A Man Called Ove + Olive Kitteridge. I loved  Lenni and Margot and Father Arthur. The love that pours out of this book and the characters was so heart warming and yet so heart breaking as you know what the end has in stored for them.  

This is a must read with a wonderful message about friendship, kindness, and faith. I have recommended it to everyone.  

LOVED IT, LOVED IT, LOVED IT! Can't believe this was the first novel by Marianne Cronin and I hope she already has another in the works. 


Marianne Cronin was born in 1990 and grew up in Warwickshire, England. She studied English at Lancaster University before earning a PhD in Applied Linguistics from the University of Birmingham. She now spends most of her time writing, with her newly-adopted rescue cat sleeping under her desk. When she's not writing, Marianne can be found performing improv in the West Midlands, where she now lives. Her debut novel, The One Hundred Years of Lenni and Margot, is to be translated into over 20 languages and is being adapted into a feature film by a major Hollywood studio.

Tuesday, September 21, 2021

The Invisible Husband of Frick Island

  ~ I received no compensation and opinions are 100% my own or my family. ~







Synopsis (from Amazon):  Sometimes all you need is one person to really see you. 

Piper Parrish's life on Frick Island—a tiny, remote town smack in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay—is nearly perfect. Well, aside from one pesky detail: Her darling husband, Tom, is dead. When Tom's crab boat capsized and his body wasn't recovered, Piper, rocked to the core, did a most peculiar thing: carried on as if her husband was not only still alive, but right there beside her, cooking him breakfast, walking him to the docks each morning, meeting him for their standard Friday night dinner date at the One-Eyed Crab. And what were the townspeople to do but go along with their beloved widowed Piper? 
 
Anders Caldwell’s career is not going well. A young ambitious journalist, he’d rather hoped he’d be a national award-winning podcaster by now, rather than writing fluff pieces for a small town newspaper. But when he gets an assignment to travel to the remote Frick Island and cover their boring annual Cake Walk fundraiser, he stumbles upon a much more fascinating tale: an entire town pretending to see and interact with a man who does not actually exist. Determined it’s the career-making story he’s been needing for his podcast, Anders returns to the island to begin covert research and spend more time with the enigmatic Piper—but he has no idea out of all the lives he’s about to upend, it’s his that will change the most.

USA Today bestselling author Colleen Oakley delivers an unforgettable love story about an eccentric community, a grieving widow, and an outsider who slowly learns that sometimes faith is more important than the facts.


One (or more) Sentence Summary: WOW - I loved this book. I have recommend The Invisible Husband of Frick Island to so many people. My book club is reading it next month and I can't wait to hear what the ladies think about it.  

I fell in love with Piper - she is such a good person. Grieving for her husband who was lost a sea and the town pretending along with her that they "see" Tom and life is normal. She is so honest and trustworthy. The Islanders all protect her.

Along comes Anders wanting to making a name for himself and is about to expose some truths and mysteries about Frick Island. He starts a podcast called "What the Frick" (love the name) and thousands begin to listen to the tales of Frick Island. However, the Islanders think he is reporting about climate change (due to the island is shrinking every year) and open up to Anders. Once Anders is exposed, the Islanders turn on him. Anders was really becoming to love the people and the island too.

Filled with quirky characters that just make the book so much more enjoyable (Pearl, Lady Judy, Harold, Tom). A really good book with great characters that develop along the way, with some humor too. This should have been in my "What's In Your Book Bag?" post. 

I am sorry to say this is my first Colleen Oakley book that I have read, but it will not be my last one.


Colleen Oakley is the USA Today bestselling author of You Were There Too and other unconventional love stories. Her books have been lauded by People Magazine, Us Weekly, Library Journal, and Real Simple, and long-listed for the Pat Conroy Southern Book Prize. She lives in Atlanta. 

Thursday, September 16, 2021

The Kitchen Front

  ~ I received no compensation and opinions are 100% my own or my family. ~





Synopsis (from Amazon):  Two years into World War II, Britain is feeling her losses: The Nazis have won battles, the Blitz has destroyed cities, and U-boats have cut off the supply of food. In an effort to help housewives with food rationing, a BBC radio program called The Kitchen Front is holding a cooking contest—and the grand prize is a job as the program’s first-ever female co-host. For four very different women, winning the competition would present a crucial chance to change their lives.

For a young widow, it’s a chance to pay off her husband’s debts and keep a roof over her children’s heads. For a kitchen maid, it’s a chance to leave servitude and find freedom. For a lady of the manor, it’s a chance to escape her wealthy husband’s increasingly hostile behavior. And for a trained chef, it’s a chance to challenge the men at the top of her profession.

These four women are giving the competition their all—even if that sometimes means bending the rules. But with so much at stake, will the contest that aims to bring the community together only serve to break it apart?




One (or more) Sentence Summary: LOVED IT! I would have to say this reminds me of the The Kitchen House but WWII times in England. 

Strong women coming together during wartime struggles. Not a fan of cooking type books and The Kitchen Front was so much more. During food rationing women had to get creative and modify recipes with the ingredients that were available. 

I loved the friendship and bonds that all came together during this book - both heartbreaking and heart warming. This would make an excellent movie. 

I read in several articles that The Kitchen Front was a top 20 book to read this summer. I decided to give it a try after all so many sources praised it. I was so happy I read it and the articles were right - A top 20 book to read this summer.  However, they missed one thing - it is a great book to read anytime.  

I wish I had put The Kitchen Front on "What's in Your Beach Bag?" post, but I had not heard anything about it at the time of the post.  I did give it an honorable mention in the end of the summer update. 

LOVED IT! I will have to go check out other Jennifer Ryan books! 


From Jennifer Ryan's Amazon page: Hello, I'm the author of National Bestseller The Chilbury Ladies' Choir, The Spies of Shilling Lane, and The Kitchen Front. Before I began writing, I was a nonfiction book editor with a passion for the Second World War. My warm and cheerful grandmother would tell stories about that era, both funny and fascinating, and the books are based on these. 

If you have read any of my books, do get in touch and tell me what you think. And please visit my website for free monthly giveaways. 

www.JenniferRyanAuthor.com
My website: www.JenniferRyanAuthor.com
Twitter: JenniferiRyan


Amazon 

Tuesday, September 14, 2021

End of Summer Update - What's in Your Beach Bag?

Update:  Below is a link to all my reviews for the books selected for beach bag! 

Some other books that were not on "in the beach bag" but were great reads this summer are:

Malibu Rising

The Invisible Husband of Frick Island (review to come)

Guncle (review to come)

The Kitchen Front (review to come)

One Hundred Years of Lenni and Margot (review to come)

Hamnet (review to come)

The Midnight Library (review to come)


What's In Your Beach Bag This Summer?


With Summer 2021 officially kicked off, it is the perfect time to determine what books I will put in my beach bag!  

This is where I list 10 (sometimes more) books that I want to read over the summer.  I seem to get the reading done most years, but have lagged in getting all the reviews posted.  Maybe 2021 will be the year that all reviews are posted by Labor Day….

Books that made the previous lists:

    2019 - What's in Your Bag?

    2020 - What's in Your Bag?

Leave me a comment letting me know at least one of the books you plan on reading this summer.  I love book suggestions.


In no particular order:

1. Message in the Sand by Hannah McKinnon 



2. When Summer Was Ours by Roxanne Veletzos

3. Royally Tied by Melanie Summers



4. That Summer by Jennifer Weiner



5. The Text God by Whitney Dineen & Melanie Summers




6.The Shell Collector by Nancy Nailg



7. before i go by Riley Weston


8. The Stepsisters by Susan Mallery


9. The Clover Girls by Viola Shipman



10. The Break-Up Book Club by Wendy Wax


Happy Summer Reading to you all!


Wednesday, September 8, 2021

Royally Tied

  ~ I received no compensation and opinions are 100% my own or my family. ~





Synopsis (from Amazon):  Don't miss the heartwarming, laugh-out-loud continuation of the Crazy Royal Love Romantic Comedy Series …After a whirlwind romance that has taken them all over the globe, rugged survival expert Will Banks and Princess Arabella of Avonia are getting ready to take a trip down the aisle.Planning the perfect wedding isn’t easy at the best of times, so when you include two families who couldn’t be more different, tensions are bound to run high. The last thing they need is a television producer determined to get every last sneer on film.With one hilarious disaster after another ruining their plans, Will and Arabella must figure out how to pull it all together in time to say ‘I do.’ Brimming with swoon-worthy romance, seriously funny shenanigans, and an unforgettable cast of characters, Melanie Summers is sure to make you laugh out loud and believe in love.

One (or more) Sentence Summary: Another hilarious book by Melanie Summers.  She never lets me down! This is the last book in the Crazy Royal Love Comedy Book series.  I am so sad, once again, to see one of her series come to an end. 

Princess Arabella and Will are preparing to walk down the aisle of the church, however, they agreed to have it all televised in order to get Will out of his contract. Super funny (especially when the two families meet and spend time together at Will's family resort (Paradise Bay - super funny series) and Will learning the royal protocol).  An absolutely must read and as always - laugh out loud scenes through out as I expect nothing else for Melanie. 

There is a 4th book coming out in the Paradise Bay series, so maybe (here's hoping) a 4th book will come out in Crazy Royal Love Comedy series!

Would I Read Other Books by the Author:  LOVE THEM!  Give me a Melanie Summers book any day.  I adore her books. See why I love her books: 

The Royal Treatment (Crown Jewels Romantic Comedy Book 1)
 The Royal Wedding (Crown Jewels Romantic Comedy Book 2)
The Royal Delivery (Crown Jewels Romantic Comedy Book 3)
The Honeymooner (A Paradise Bay Romantic Comedy Book 1)
Whisked Away (A Paradise Bay Romantic Comedy Book 2)
The Suite Life (A Paradise Bay Romantic Comedy Book 3)
The After Wife (stand alone - will make you cry too)
Royally Crushed (Crazy Royal Love Romantic Comedy Book 1)
Royally Wildly (Crazy Royal Love Romantic Comedy Book 2) can't believe I never posted the review. 



Melanie Summers currently resides in Edmonton, Canada, with her husband, three young children, and their goofy dog. When she's not writing romance novels, she loves reading, snuggling up on the couch with her family for movie night (which would not be complete without lots of popcorn and milkshakes), and long walks in the woods near her house. Melanie is a member of the Romance Writers of America, as well as the International Women's Writing Guild.

Monday, September 6, 2021

The Text God: Text and You Shall Receive….

  ~ I received no compensation and opinions are 100% my own or my family. ~



Synopsis (from Amazon):  Text and you shall receive...

Jen Flanders moved to New York to be an artist. This translates into walking dogs for money, practicing yoga for sanity, and hitting up her friends at a local bakery to supplement her diet. Rent is due and she's running out of cash. After begging the universe for a sign that help is on the way, her phone pings with an incoming text. GOD: You can do it; I believe in you!

Gabriel Oliver Daly agreed to mentor a friend's younger sister. Unbeknownst to him, after losing her phone, said sister uses her dog walker's phone to text him about a job offer. He responds enthusiastically. 

Jen can't believe GOD is actually texting her! But who is she to question the ways of the universe? On the first day of texting, GOD gets her a job that will keep her afloat. On the second and third days he offers even more help.

Gabriel starts to think his friend's sister might be too flighty to make it in the legal jungle of New York. Why exactly does she need a survival job? Wasn't she supposed to be interviewing for a position as a junior lawyer? And why is she texting him random (not to mention very personal) stuff all the time?

When they finally meet, Jen realizes GOD isn't a deity but a divinely handsome lawyer. A complete stranger has answered all her prayers. After all, God does move in mysterious ways.


One (or more) Sentence Summary:  I loved the first book in the series (they are all stand-alone) An Accidentally in Love Book Series, Text Me Tuesday, so I purposely allowed myself to read one chapter per day when reading The Text God. It was extremely hard to only read one chapter a day, but I had to make this book last a while.

It is no secret that Melanie Summers is one of my favorite authors. I also loved Whitney Dineen's The Creek Water Series. So imagine a six book series written by the two of them together…..how can I not ove it. 

Jen is absolutely hilarious-bills are due and she needs a job or to sell a painting when she asks for a sign. What she gets is a text message from GOD. Gabriel Oliver Daly is GOD, whose number is accidentally entered by a dog walking client of Jen into her phone. The text messages between Jen and GOD for weeks are just too funny. 

Gabe breaks it off with his finance and leaves his job. His family thinks he is having a breakdown. Jen and Gabe's world collides at The Salty Nut Tavern (owned by Mary and Joseph (Gabe's parents). When they both realize that Gabe is GOD and Jen is not his friend's sister - things get interesting. 

The Text God has a lot of humor through it, extremely funny characters and a great story line.  Another must read by Summers and Dineen. Now I get to start book 3 in the series, The Text Wars: May the Text be With You.



Whitney DineenUSA Today Bestselling author Whitney Dineen is a rock star in her own head. While delusional about her singing abilities, there’s been a plethora of validation that she’s a fairly decent author (AMAZING!!!). After winning many writing awards and selling nearly a kabillion books (math may not be her forte, either), she’s decided to let the voices in her head say whatever they want (sorry, Mom). She also won a fourth-place ribbon in a fifth-grade swim meet in backstroke. So, there’s that.

Melanie Summers: Currently resides in Edmonton, Canada, with her husband, three young children, and their goofy dog. When shes not writing romance novels, she loves reading, snuggling up on the couch with her family for movie night (which would not be complete without lots of popcorn and milkshakes), and long walks in the woods near her house. Melanie is a member of the Romance Writers of America, as well as the International Womens Writing Guild.